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The Role of Sleep In Recovery

The Role of Sleep In Recovery

First of all, some sleep facts regarding athletes.

Sleep is critically important for athletes as shown by research of 175 elite athletes performed by Swinbourne et al. 2016. The study found 50% of the athletes investigated presented as "poor sleepers". In addition 28% of these athletes also reported clinically significant daytime sleepiness. Furthermore injury is strongly associated with lesser hours of sleep per night, this will be discussed later in the post.

The Role of Strength & Conditioning in Endurance Performance

The Role of Strength & Conditioning in Endurance Performance

Introduction:

For too long endurance athletes have been missing out on unlocking their full potential. Regardless of your training philosophy to improve overall aerobic ability, too many endurance athletes neglect the physiological enhancement that specific strength programming can have on improving performance and reducing the likelihood of injury.

Even those who do partake in strength training often buy into philosophy's of "over-specificity" rather than nailing the fundamentals of movement and aiming to improve the neuromuscular capacity of the body to output more efficient and economical movement patterns which are the the primary outcomes of any quality strength training intervention.

To maximise the neuromuscular development we must training appropriately. Endurance athletes are not strength sport athletes! Therefore we must treat strength training as general preparation and aim to develop key functional athletic attributes, rather than trying to train the exact movement we do in our sport under a resistance.

The Neglected Training Session which will Unlock your Physiological Potential

The Neglected Training Session which will Unlock your Physiological Potential

We’ve tested hundreds of endurance athletes, and at least 80% have a significant amount of untapped performance potential. Their aerobic base is good, their functional threshold is solid, but their aerobic power is lacking.

Aerobic power is the ability to use oxygen quickly, and is trained through accumulating time above 95% VO2 max. Aerobic capacity, on the other hand, is the ability to use oxygen over a given distance, such as being physically able to complete an Iron distance triathlon, and is trained through your long, slow distance base training.

High Intensity vs Low Intensity Training: The Ideal Ratio for Endurance Athletes

High Intensity vs Low Intensity Training: The Ideal Ratio for Endurance Athletes

It may come as a surprise, but you don’t need to complete hours and hours of continuous training to be successful in endurance sport.

No, really, science says so.

That’s not to say that volume isn’t important. In fact, you’d be silly not to train long distances if you want to succeed in long distance events such as Ironman, 3peaks, multi-stage races, ultra-marathons etc.

BUT, you may not need as much volume as you think.